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Are you feeling overwhelmed by the challenges that the global pandemic has thrust upon you? A positive change method called Prosocial can help you in the space of an hour.

Many people use words such as “evolve” and “adapt” in the vernacular to describe their need for positive change, but Prosocial is distinctively based on the actual science of change—evolutionary science—which goes beyond the study of genetic evolution to include personal and cultural evolution.

Prosocial is currently being implemented around the world through trained facilitators working with groups, but the current pandemic calls for a more rapid way to communicate its active ingredients. Fortunately, these ingredients are easy to understand and put to work, so we have created this “speed” version of Prosocial and offer it free of charge. Like speed dating, speed Prosocial only begins a relationship that merits much more exploration, but we are confident that this short introduction by Prosocial’s chief trainer, Paul Atkins, can provide immediate benefits. Let’s get started!

Step 1: The Individual Matrix: This simple but powerful exercise can help you as an individual become more adaptable at working around obstacles to achieve your valued goals—including the obstacles imposed by the pandemic.  

Step 2: The Group Matrix: The same exercise can help the groups in your life become more adaptable in the same way. All the groups in your life, such as your family, friends, neighborhood, church, workplace, school, non-profit, volunteer organization, and so on. The video focuses on how a family might use it to cope with the pandemic.

Step 3: The Core Design Principles: Groups require certain core design principles to function at their best. When you learn about them, you are likely to conclude that they are: a) easy to understand; b) important for the groups in your life; but c) not implemented as well as they should be!

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Step 4: Hitting the Ground Running a Marathon: After you have become more adaptable with the help of the Matrix and informed about the core design principles for efficacious groups, you can immediately begin working around obstacles to achieve your valued goals. You can begin at the local scale—yourself as an individual and the current groups in your life. But you can also become an agent of positive change at larger scales, because the same design principles needed for effective cooperation within groups are needed for effective cooperation between groups—all the way up to the nations and major corporations that comprise the global village.

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If you find this short introduction to Prosocial useful, we encourage you to deepen your understanding by visiting the Prosocial.world website

Adapt and thrive!  

Published On: April 3, 2020

David Sloan Wilson

David Sloan Wilson

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David Sloan Wilson is SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University. He applies evolutionary theory to all aspects of humanity in addition to the rest of life, both in his own research and as director of EvoS, a unique campus-wide evolutionary studies program that recently received NSF funding to expand into a nationwide consortium. His books include Darwin’s Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society, Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin’s Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives, and The Neighborhood Project: Using Evolution to Improve My City, One Block at a Time and Does Altruism Exist? Culture, Genes, and the Welfare of Others. .

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