Baboons, like people, really do get by with a little help from their friends. Humans with strong social ties live longer, healthier lives, whereas hostility and “loner” tendencies can set the stage for disease and early death. In animals, too, strong social networks contribute to longer lives and healthier offspring—and now it seems that personality may be just as big a factor in other primates’ longevity status. A new study found that female baboons that had the most stable relationships with other females weren’t always the highest up in the dominance hierarchy or the ones with close kin around—but they were the nicest.

Scientists are increasingly seeing personality as a key factor in an animal’s ability to survive, adapt, and thrive in its environment. But this topic isn’t an easy one to study scientifically, says primatologist Dorothy Cheney of the University of Pennsylvania. “Research in mammals, birds, fish, and insects shows individual patterns of behavior that can’t be easily explained. But the many studies of personality are based on human traits like conscientiousness, agreeableness, or neuroticism. It isn’t clear how to apply those traits to animals,” Cheney says.

Along with a group of scientists—including co-authors Robert Seyfarth, also at the University of Pennsylvania, and primatologist Joan Silk of Arizona State University, Tempe—Cheney has studied wild baboons at the Moremi Game Reserve in Botswana for almost 20 years. Besides providing detailed, long-term observations of behavior in several generations of baboons, the research has yielded a wealth of biological and genetic information.

Read more at Science.

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